Landlords Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR)

Updated 24 May 2021

I expected this to happen. I have seen several EICR’s from Landlords carried out by “local” Electricians. – They have FAILED inspection!

Your first starting point if you are concerned about failures on your EICR is to refer your Electrican to the current version (2018) of BS 7671 …

Reason: EICR is always made against Current Regulations (18th Revision) which came into force 1st January 2019, however allowance has to be made for the regulations that were current when the current electrical system was “installed”. So, what is NOW considered Dangerous (according to current regulations) was NOT considered Dangerous when it was installed. Its a bit like Car Seat belts. We All (?) think these are good Safety Feature of Modern Cars – but Cars built prior to 1962 do NOT need seat belts to be fitted, but they are still legal to drive and will still pass an MOT. (OK you don’t HAVE to have an MOT on such an old vehicle, but its still advised that you do). But would YOU want to ride in a car without Seat belts?

One problem seems to be that “Testers” are either ignorant of the fact that whilst the installation has to be tested against the current (18th) regulations, consideration has to be made of the regulations in force when the house was built. It seems that many don’t seem aware of this, don’t know their regulations history OR are looking to make good money while Landlords having left things to the last moment (EICR’s must be in place by 1st April) are like Rabbits Caught in the Car Headlights!

The testing identifies problems with the following labels:

C1: Dangerous NOW

C2: Dangerous if a Fault Occurs

C3: Improvement Required (Could do better!) – a bit like an Advisory on an MOT – Don’t dismiss it, be aware of the areas where your property does NOT meet current standards.

FI: Futher investigation: This means “he couldn’t figure something out” that was bothering him without spending more time – This is also a failure.

https://www.intersafe.co.uk/news/fixed-wire-testing-observation-codes-c1-c2-c3-and-fi-explained/

So, if YOU have had a recent inspection and the inspection flagged up:

NO RCD PROTECTION….. THEN CHALLENGE IT!

This means the Electrician is looking to do some expensive “remedial” work in order to Pass your Property as Safe! In other words – He wants at least a days work to replace your “Fusebox” and retest your house.

He may also have found other things (in your 20 -50 year old house) that does NOT comply with 2019 Installation Standards!

So here are some key points for all you Landlords that have received Fail Certificates:-

If your house electrical system was installed before these dates they do NOT apply to you:

  • RCD’s were NOT required on Lighting Circuits until January 1st 2019.
  • RCD’s were NOT required on ANY circuits until January 2008.

  • Cables Concealed in Wall less then 50mm – Not a problem for houses built before January 2008.
  • No RCD Protection for Circuits (or cables) passing through Bathrooms. (This is getting repetitive). Not a problem for houses built before January 2008.
  • Earth cables do NOT necessarily have to be 16mm – this depends on several factors including age of property.
  • Meter tails do NOT necessarily have to be 25mm – this depends on factors.
  • Downlights are not Fire Rated. This is Building Regs Thing… Ideally downlights should be Fire-rated for general safety (I won’t fit non-down rated ones) but if they are already in place and have been for some time its not an issue (C3?). New ones installed downstairs should always be Fire rated. However, there should be no blue/brown or black/red inner wiring exposed, and the earth wires should be connected around the circuit even if not used by the light itself. (C2 for inner wiring problem, C3 for lack of earth if the light is double insulated, C2 if the light needs an earth)
  • You do NOT have to have “Trips” (MCB’s) if “of an age” is OK to have “Fuses” or “Fuse wire” fuses.
  • If the Water pipe entering your property is PLASTIC as it comes out of the ground into your Kitchen (or wherever) it does NOT have to be Bonded to Earth. This is actually a change in the latest (18th) regulations, but in this case you CAN apply retrospectively.
  • However, IF you don’t have RCD’s you MUST have FULL BONDING on all your water pipes inside the house. – So this could fail you instead!

Having said that, I would not want to live, nor expect my Tenants to live in a house without RCD protection on at least the socket circuits. And if you have FULL RCD protection, you probably don’t need the Bonding anymore on your water pipes. The most sensible way to install RCD protection on all circuits is to replace the Fuse box – but I repeat – YOU DO NOT HAVE TO HAVE RCD PROTECTION on houses older than 2008! – Unless you have your Fusebox replaced in which case it MUST be a full RCD type!

So, if you do have “NO RCD” problems flagged, you really *should* think about a new Fusebox for Safety – RCD protection could literally mean the difference between Life and Death – but you don’t have to have one fitted right now in a panic!

Other problems that are often incorrectly reported as C2 or C1:

  • No Earth on Lighting Circuit. Houses built before 1966 did NOT have to have Earth Circuits (we often call them CPC’s on our certificates). So this is not a fail either ?

Yes and no. If you only have Plastic Light fittings and Plastic Light Switches – then NO this is NOT a failure – you do NOT need a rewire – you just need a Safety Notice on your Fusebox as a Warning. If you do have Metal fittings anywhere on your lighting circuits – either you need a Lighting Rewire or replace all the Metal stuff with Plastic or fit “Double Insulated” metal light fittings and get a Warning Label on your Fusebox.

  • Bathroom fittings not IP rated. So? What exactly are these fittings are where are they located? A bathroom is divided into Zones. The worst is above a Shower or Bath – A shower (Zone 1) extends to 2.25 meters from the floor and Zone 2 extends 60cms to the sides to the sides. See this diagram for full explanation: https://www.jlmelectrical.co.uk/bathroom-zones-explained/

    So a “Pendant” or Batten light in the middle of the bathroom does not fail an EICR provided it is further than 60 cms from the Shower. A Down light above the shower does NOT fail EICR if it’s higher than 2.25m from the floor – however if its NOT splash rated (IPx3 at least) then he may have a point!
    https://www.jlmelectrical.co.uk/i-p-ratings-explained/
    Also if the cover is missing from the light fitting exposing live contacts, even if just the screw heads of a “chocolate block” connector – this is a failure – Live Contacts exposed!
  • Fusebox should be Metal, not Plastic. This only applies to Boxes installed after January 2013, if they are found to be Plastic, and this is not even a C3!
  • Smoke Alarms out of date or not working. Nothing to do with an EICR, Its good to know, but not grounds for Failure. However as a Landlord this could later find you in Court! So thank him for bringing this to your attention. Be aware the Smoke alarm may be wired in, therefore you might want him to replace them for you.

There will likely be a lot more “Faults” your Electrician may find – Some appear to be “made up” – i.e. Nothing in the Regulations at all.

Some faults may be “Building Regulations” issues – These are usually NO REASON to fail an Electrical Inspection – at worst these should be C3’s

If you have a failed EICR and an expensive bill to “fix it” – you can always call in another Electrician for a second opinion – The trouble is – he could be the first guys “Brother in Law” !

See here for more explanation – Its a guide for Electricians really – so if in doubt send him (or her) link to this page:

https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/professional-resources/wiring-regulations/inspection-testing-certification-and-reporting/

If you do have a Failed EICR you could email me a copy. I can’t guarantee to comment very quickly because I have LOTS of EICR’s to do!! (and very little fuseboxes to replace!) but it would be of interest to me to see whats going on.

If you really do not believe your Electrician after you have challenged his findings, then contact his “Registration Body” – NAPIT, ELECSA, NICEIC, STROMA etc. and see what they have to say. And if you HAVE paid to have “unnecessary” work carried out – again Contact his Registration body. Just Search the Internet for the Registration Body contact details.

If you are notified of any Failures (C1, C2, FI) – you are “Expected” to resolve these within 28 days. C3’s – Just think about them and plan to fix them.

Of course, just because of what I have said above does not mean that there are other things in your house that are not genuine failures. When an Electrician issues a PASS, HE is taking responsibility for the Safety from you and taking it onto his own shoulders – so he has to be careful what he accepts, with regards to “Safety” and the Regulations.

So what if I don’t have an satisfactory EICR in place by 1st April 2021?

If the local authority believe a landlord to be in breach of the duties set out by the regulations, they must serve a remedial notice to the landlord who must then carry out the action recommended.

If the local authority has concluded, beyond reasonable doubt, that a private landlord has breached their duties under the regulations, they may issue a notice of intent to impose a financial penalty. This penalty is determined by the local authority but cannot exceed the amount of £30,000.

I would think right now that the Local Council have got more pressing matters to be worrying about! – But you might find it more difficult to evict your Tenant if you don’t have one after this date. But you will find it very difficult to evict them anyway at present! (COVID-19)

I am only booking a maximum of 2 Days for EICR’s each week. That is a maximum of 4 EICR’s per week. This is to allow me to process the paperwork, attend to my other business etc. but I am still accepting more EICR’s – I am currently booking EICR’s into Late May.

Further reading:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Wiring_regs_history

https://www.niceic.com/www.niceic.com/media/PDF/FactSheet-Electrics-A4-4pp.pdf

and here…

15 thoughts on “Landlords Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR)”

  1. Hi Tony, came across you while trying to get my head around an EICR I’ve recently had which I’m still trying to do, really glad I did come across you as the information you give is really informative, thank you, one of my main questions is are mains connected smoke alarms to be included in the report?
    The below is an overview of the inspection and really just want to understand if the below is accurate to what I need to be doing to a property built in 1996.
    Thank you in advance if there is any guidance you can give me.

    C1. Danger present.
    C2. Potentially dangerous.
    C3. Improvement recommended.

    Items 1, 2 and 6 have been rectified.

    Item .
    3/ C2. Seal holes in top of immersion heater connections.
    4/ C2. Replace 2 x immersion heater double pole switches for 13A switched fused spurs.
    5/ C3. Upgrade busbar in consumer unit to allow for an addition 16A MCB which will allow for the immersion to be on its own circuit.
    7/ C2. Replace bathroom light with a suitable IP rating.
    8/ C3. Replace battern holder light fitting at bottom of stairs.
    9/ C3. Refix kitchen light.
    11/ C3. Re-terminate supply cables in consumer unit.
    12/ C3. Seal large hole in plasterboard above consumer unit.
    14/ C3. Replace faulty 4″ extractor fan in bathroom.
    15/ C2. Investigate and improve the high reading on the continuity of the cpc ring.
    16/ C2. Seal hole in top of switched spur in cupboard under sink, also investigate its use.
    17/ C3. Label consumer unit and isolation switches with their use.

    Also.
    Replace existing out of date smoke alarms with 2 x mains linked 10 year lithium battery smoke alarms.

    On completion we will provide a satisfactory electrical condition report.

    1. Andy
      Firstly, I would like to state that “I don’t class myself as “an expert” – But I am Fully Qualified and experienced, but… I’ve just phoned NAPIT technical support twice this morning to confirm that I was not being un-reasonable with my failures!

      Also, remember, it’s not just the age of the house – but rather the age of the “Electrical Installation” – so, if (for example) the CU has been replaced in the past, then you should judge the installation on this date… or if work has been carried out recently – then you should perhaps apply that date where relevant. When electrical work is carried out that work must comply with the “current” regulations at the time.

      So to comment:

      Item .
      3/ C2. Seal holes in top of immersion heater connections.
      4/ C2. Replace 2 x immersion heater double pole switches for 13A switched fused spurs.
      5/ C3. Upgrade busbar in consumer unit to allow for an addition 16A MCB which will allow for the immersion to be on its own circuit.

      Immersion heaters are *supposed* to be on their own circuits – with nothing else on them… however in “older days” I (assume) this was not a regulation ?? Its not unusual to find boiler, or occasionally a socket on this circuit – but provided its on it’s own circuit and protected by a 16A MCB / Fuse, then I accept it. If an Immersion heater is fed from the Ring (not advisable as it’s takes a lot of the capacity of the ring) then Yes – it should be protected by a 13 FCU. If you are going to put it onto it’s own circuit in the CU (16A), then it doesn’t need an FCU and the original switch would suffice – but 13A gives better protection.

      7/ C2. Replace bathroom light with a suitable IP rating.

      Assuming that it is “in the zone” (and not outside the zone – remember the Zone stops at 2.25m from the floor)

      8/ C3. Replace battern holder light fitting at bottom of stairs.
      Why? if loose or damaged then C2, if showing signs of discolouration (100W bulb!) then C3

      9/ C3. Refix kitchen light.
      Is it loose? C2

      11/ C3. Re-terminate supply cables in consumer unit.
      Why?

      12/ C3. Seal large hole in plasterboard above consumer unit.
      14/ C3. Replace faulty 4″ extractor fan in bathroom.
      15/ C2. Investigate and improve the high reading on the continuity of the cpc ring.
      This is usually a loose connection in the back of one (or more) of the sockets. – I often find it quicker to open then all up and tighten screws than try to be “clever” and try to trace the fault with my meter! But, firsts make a beeline for any sockets that have been “replaced” -by Bodger Bill… often “amateurs” replace sockets, light-switches and lights and fail to tighten the connections properly!

      16/ C2. Seal hole in top of switched spur in cupboard under sink, also investigate its use.

      17/ C3. Label consumer unit and isolation switches with their use.

      Also, in 1996 it did NOT required Full RCD protection, whereas any new work done now does. BUT, if you don’t have FULL RCD protection, then you need to ensure the Bonding is good in the Bathroom – unless its not required (plastic pipes and insulation of taps to earth is >20K to earth. If you DO have full RCD protection, then the 18th Regs says Supplementarty bonding is not required – but check you don’t have a metal waste pipe outside – External Conductive Part! See Here for more information: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVxBettQpPU

      I am carrying out “many” Landlord EICR’s at present – I have only had ONE go through without any intervention from me! I usually allow 3-4 hours per EICR and fix what I can within this time, so that I can sign off without a re-visit – but that’s just how I do it.

    2. Not sure you are correct about the ‘No Earth on Lighting Circuit’ issue. Yes, you must label the fusebox and you must not fit anything but plastic light fittings and switches, but metal back boxes and metal faceplate screws are the real issue here. Old ones had plastic lugs to receive the switch fixing screws but new ones don’t, so potentially you have a safety issue with touch point to the metal faceplate screws. It’s a C2 if that’s the case, unless you fit flush boxes on everything. I may be wrong but I have not seen replacement plastic faceplate screws in years… Oh, and don’t rely on those white round plastic bungs either because they fall out.

      1. A debatable point – the screws on the faceplate. I think you have to consider this… perhaps “bungs” if they are “solidly” fixed, or possible a small amount of “glue” – they often have to be destroyed to remove anyway. But it is a point for consideration. However, if there is no earth at all then the switch is fully plastic and well-insulated. The back-box then becomes a “floating” conductive part – inaccessible – other than if the screws can be touched. So I guess this calls for use of the “British Standard Test Finger” (yes there IS such a thing!) to see if contact can be made should a wire come out of the back of the switch. Certainly a point for consideration.

        Further reading here:

        https://www.amazon.co.uk/GOWE-IEC61032-IEC60529-Probe-Finger/dp/B01GMGFNIE/ref=pd_lpo_14_t_0/260-3798557-3548743?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01GMGFNIE&pd_rd_r=a7ce711b-2d74-4983-b503-098677fe7a5e&pd_rd_w=qIfjV&pd_rd_wg=OK6np&pf_rd_p=3366510f-1771-44b5-99e2-20c1889506ac&pf_rd_r=J25VZNGD1W8YVAWRFSXP&psc=1&refRID=J25VZNGD1W8YVAWRFSXP

        https://professional-electrician.com/technical/lighting-circuits-without-cpc/

        https://napitweb.azureedge.net/member-downloads/CP%207%2007%20P%2028%20Ask%20Eddie%20Lighting%20Circuits%20with%20no%20cpc.pdf

        https://www.crannistech.co.uk/lighting/

        https://www2.theiet.org/forums/forum/messageview.cfm?FTVAR_FORUMVIEWTMP=Threaded&catid=205&threadid=5848

  2. Mains connected smoke alarms. If they are connected to the mains – then they are of concern for Electrical Safety. – however, they don’t usually use the earth, so if they are un-earthed I just regard as a C3. If they are “out of date” – recommend to the Landlord that they should be replaced – but from the EICR – all you care about is Electrical Safety – not if they are out of date or missing! They don’t need to be interlinked – unless an HMO – or a Recent build, or a Recent Extension has been built – in which case the Building Control Officer will have requested Interlinked Mains powered Alarms anyway – in ALL of the property – not just the new extension! – in which case, I usually fit AICO Wireless alarms (Wireless bases) as you can “mix and match” wired and wireless with Aico. Some makes don’t support mixing.

  3. Hi Tony,

    I had EICR done yesterday (16/04/21) which I am in process of purchasing and I have been send the following errors by the electrician. Please advise as I am thinking electrician is taking me for a ride.

    Thanks

    Please see attached quote for remedial works . The Following defects were found in the installation which has resulted in an unsatisfactory report.

    1) Socket Circuits up to 32A require RCD protection – 1 on DB1, 1 on DB2 and 1 on DB3 require this.

    2) Cables encased in walls require RCD protection if they are buried below 50mm deep. 5 on DB1, 4 on DB2 require this. ( additional to ones above )

    3) The light switch in the front living room has no earth in the cable – you need to change this from a metal switch to a plastic one, or rewire the cable. I’ve allocated to replace switch.

    4) Downlights must be Fire rated if they have a room above. The downlights on the ground and First floor will need to be changed.

    5) Where cables connect into an accessory, all inner cores of the cable must be enclosed in the enclosure, at every downlight they have been poorly terminated and inner cores are visable outside the downlight enclosure.

    6) There must be no holes in the top of any accessories bigger than ip4x. Where a cable enter the consumer unit DB1 the hole is larger than this. Fire Mastic required to seal hole.

    7) On the Socket ring in the loft, you have an open circuit on the live conductors. This needs to be investigated and found to repair.

    To repair defects on DB1, you can either replace the consumer unit for an up to date one and this would clear all defects, or install RCBOs on the required circuits.
    Defects on DB2 can be cleard by swapping the main switch for an RCD switch.
    Defects on DB3 in garage require an RCBO on the socket circuit. This is an older make of board so procuring these can be quite hard.
    The DownLights I use of a high quality unit, These come with an integrated LED and a lifetime of 25000 hours. if you’d prefer a cheaper option then i can alter this on the quote.
    By changing the Downlights, this would also resolve the issue of them being poorly terminated.
    The socket ring in the loft requires fault finding to find the issue. this is most probably a loose connection in one of the sockets.

    Please feel free to come back with any questions you may have. I can send you any documentation required to show how these findings have occurred.

    Description of works –

    Remedial works cost:

    1) Replace 57 downlights with fire rated downlights.

    2) Install 1RCD for DB2

    3) Install 6 RCBOs in DB1 for required circuits or replace consumer unit

    4) Fix hole in top of DB1

    5) Investigate open circuit on sockets in loft room

    6) Install 1 RCBO in DB3 for sockets

    7) Change metal light switch in front room for plastic light switch

    Cost of materials and labour –

    1) 57 spot lights @ £14.23 each – £811.11

    2) 1 x RCD @ £63 each – £63

    3) 6 RCBOs @ £29 each – £174

    4) Fire mastic – £3

    5) Labour only 1 hour – £50

    6) 1 x RCBO @ £34

    7) 1 x plastic light switch @ £3.24

    8) Labour – 2 days @ £250 – £500

    Total Amount £1638.35

    This Quote is valid for 30 days. All Quotes are final and cover description of works only. Any additional extras will be discussed with client prior to work being carried out. Please read attached terms and conditions for further information.

    1. Firstly: How OLD is the property? How OLD is the current electrical installation – Both these factors NEED to be considered by the person testing. Testing has to be carried out against the 18th, BUT PASS/FAIL must be decided against the regulations in place at the time of installation and the “judgement” of the inspector – example if a house still has original electrics installed to regulations in force on 1895 I would most likely FAIL it!

      >> 1) Socket Circuits up to 32A require RCD protection – 1 on DB1, 1 on DB2 and 1 on DB3 require this.
      Only if installed since 2008! If this is an “older” installation, it does NOT have to be brought up to current standards – unless the existing electrical system is being “modified” (Replacing existing components with “like for like” does not apply – So NO RCD protection, whilst I highly recommend it – is NOT required.
      see BS7671 (2018), page 4, “Introduction to BS 7671:2018”, 2nd paragraph!

      >> 2) Cables encased in walls require RCD protection if they are buried below 50mm deep. 5 on DB1, 4 on DB2 require this. ( additional to ones above )
      Only if installed since 2008! – See above for rest of my comment

      3) The light switch in the front living room has no earth in the cable – you need to change this from a metal switch to a plastic one, or rewire the cable. I’ve allocated to replace switch.
      Yes, not earthed – fit plastic switch and plastic light or double insulated – and put Warning Notice on Fusebox. (CU)

      >> 4) Downlights must be Fire rated if they have a room above. The downlights on the ground and First floor will need to be changed.
      NO! ONLY A RECOMMENDATION! But see comment about poor wiring – replacement with better to wire units is the best option…

      >> 5) Where cables connect into an accessory, all inner cores of the cable must be enclosed in the enclosure, at every downlight they have been poorly terminated and inner cores are visable outside the downlight enclosure.
      Sadly, often the way – there are a lot of COWBOY downlight installations out there! It may be cheaper to have them taken out and some LED batten lights fitted – but they won’t look so nice!


      >> 6) There must be no holes in the top of any accessories bigger than ip4x. Where a cable enter the consumer unit DB1 the hole is larger than this. Fire Mastic required to seal hole.
      Correct.

      >> 7) On the Socket ring in the loft, you have an open circuit on the live conductors. This needs to be investigated and found to repair.
      This is a FAULT – Most likely loose wires in the back of a socket – OR someone has put a NAIL through a cable! Not possible to say how long this will take to fix. about 15 mins if just a case of opening the sockets and checking the wires are screwed in correctly.

      >> To repair defects on DB1, you can either replace the consumer unit for an up to date one and this would clear all defects, or install RCBOs on the required circuits.
      >> Defects on DB2 can be cleard by swapping the main switch for an RCD switch.
      >> Defects on DB3 in garage require an RCBO on the socket circuit. This is an older make of board so procuring these can be quite hard.

      NOT REQUIRED IMHO – Maybe you should talk to another local electrical for an opinion – or contact the registration body of your Electrician to question his diagnosis?

      >> The DownLights I use of a high quality unit, These come with an integrated LED and a lifetime of 25000 hours. if you’d prefer a cheaper option then i can alter this on the quote.
      >> By changing the Downlights, this would also resolve the issue of them being poorly terminated.

      This what I would do – I use LAP ones from Screwfix. But its time consuming replacing them all – and they have to fit the existing holes – or more problems to overcome.

      >> The socket ring in the loft requires fault finding to find the issue. this is most probably a loose connection in one of the sockets.
      Agreed

      1. Thanks a lot Tony for your advice. I’m getting another electrician to give me second opinion before I carry out the remedial work.

  4. Thanks a lot Tony for your advice. I’m getting another electrician to give me second opinion before I carry out the remedial work.

  5. Hi Tony, just received this EICR. Would be grateful for any help, particulaly re battery smoke alarms (obviously we will replace the one that is out of date – but didn’t think the two good ones needed to be ripped out and three new interlinked installed).
    Point 16 refers to a second fridge that the tenant has placed himself in the entrance hall, and is not one supplied by me. Below the schedule I have placed the quote.

    Referring to the Schedule of Items Inspected (see PART 10), the attached Schedule of Circuit Details and Test Results (see PART 12), and subject to any agreed limitations listed in PART 7:
    There are no items adversely affecting electrical safety ( ), OR The following observations and recommendations for action are made:
    Item No Observation(s) Code Location Reference

    Additional pages? ( ) State page numbers: ( )
    Immediate action required for items: ( ) Improvement recommended for items: ( )
    Urgent remedial action required for items: ( ) Further investigation required for items: ( )
    No Code C1’s
    1 3.6 Unable to locate bonding connections C3 Services
    2 4.3 IP4X not met top of fuse board due to holes C2 Fuse board
    3 4.4 Fuse board made of combustible material C3 Fuse board
    4 4.11 a)No circuit charts present C3 Fuse board
    5 4.11 e)Mixed colours warning label missing C3 Fuse board
    6 5.2 Lack of fixings to cables in roof void in multiple locations, lack of fire rated fixings to cable in hallway, lack of fixings to cable above fuse board C2 Various
    7 5.10Cables in loft there is a cable running along the walkway with no protection, cable drop to socket in entrance lobby not protected C2 Various
    8 5.17Damaged socket in top bedroom, dated and damaged double dimmer in living room, also loose C2 Various
    9 7.6 Non fire rated down light in living room C2 Living room
    10 7.7 b)Non enclosed down light in living room C2 Living room
    11 8.6 Bathroom light is out of zones but not IP rated for enviroment C3 Bathroom
    12 Bathroom fan transformer is buzzing loudly when switched on – low voltage FI Bathroom
    13 Gas installation pipes wander lead test reading above maximum permissible C2 Gas pipework
    14 Open neutral circuit 8 FI Fuse board
    15 Shaver socket missing fixing screw C2 Bathroom
    16 Fridge in hallway is connected to extension lead trailing around floor and liable to damage C2 Hallway (tenants have placed this secondary fridge – it is not supplied by landlord)
    17 2nd floor smoke alarm out of date C2 2nd floor
    18 Smoke alarms are not interlinked C2 Pr
    QUOTE
    Scope of works
    1 x Seal holes in top of fuse board
    1 x Trunking and fire clips to hall socket supply
    1 x Additional surface mount socket to be installed
    for fridge in surface mini trunking with fire clips
    3 x Aico battery radio interlinked optical smoke
    alarms
    1 x JCC V50 led fire rated spot light to lounge
    1 x 2 gang dimmer switch and repair to back box
    lugs in living room
    1 x Low voltage fan and 12v transformer in bathroom
    1 x Fixing screw to shaver socket in bathroom
    1 x Double socket replacement in 2nd floor front
    bedroom
    1 x Trunking and fixings to loft light switch cables
    1 x Trunking to cable running across loft floor
    1 x Fixings to loose boiler cables
    1 x Further investigation to circuit 8 kitchen socket
    open neutral
    Retest and certify
    Labour and all materials
    Please note any parking costs will be added to the
    final invoice if applicable
    1 1250.00 20% 1,250.00
    Subtotal £ 1,250.00
    20% (VAT on Income) (20.0 %) £ 250.00
    Page 1 of
    2
    TOTAL £1,500.00

  6. Another example of incorrect / incompetent EICR

    Briefly:

    Ignore C3’s.

    C2 means “Dangerous If a Fault Occurs” so if in doubt – Ask your electrician to define what Fault could occur that he regards as Dangerous for each item!

    See top of my article – I’ve updated it with an extract with the relevant section of BS7671 regarding earlier installations… ALL inspections MUST be carried out against current regulations, but they only fail if they do not comply with the regulations IN FORCE at the TIME of Installation! So what may be a C2 if installed today, may only be a C3 if installed historically.

    Smoke alarms – interlinked and mains powered only required for New Builds… No mains powered ones required, no interlinked required! This is a common “incorrect” failure

    See here:
    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/smoke-and-carbon-monoxide-alarms-explanatory-booklet-for-landlords/the-smoke-and-carbon-monoxide-alarm-england-regulations-2015-qa-booklet-for-the-private-rented-sector-landlords-and-tenants

    6. – Are the cables hanging down? or just “lying on the surface” ? Is the roof void a “frequently accessed” location? is there likely to be any damage? Fire clips NOT required to fitted “retrospectively” – Therefore NOT a failure! (unless installed after 2019!)

    No idea what 7 refers to – you would have to go and look…

    9. Fire rated downlights are NOT required on existing installaion ! (but are a good idea!)
    16. Installation is inspecting the “installed” electrical system – NOT any extension leads – they are NOT installed – unplug the extension lead and ask him to strike it out – all he should do is “comment” on the use of extension leads as a C3 if they are plugged in!
    17. … Smoke alarm out of date – C2? How does a “Smoke alarm out of date” result in an “Electrical Danger should a fault occur” ? Out of date alarms have nothing to do with him – but thank him for drawing the date to your attention.

    I keep getting these EICR’s being sent to me – I don’t publicly comment on all of them.. but we either have a lot of Incompetent Electricansm or a lot of “try it ons”…
    If you receive an EICR you have doubts about (having read ALL of my comments above), I suggest you go here:

    https://www.electricalcompetentperson.co.uk/

    Phone up a local electrician from this register and discuss your failures with him, especially with respect to the links I have provided above to other “specialist” websites giving guidance on all of this. You could also try calling your originals Electrican’s registration body if you have serious doubts about his competence!

    1. Tony, thanks for your comments.
      In reply to your points, none of the cables are hanging down.
      The downlight was within the reguation existing at the time it was installed.
      The light in the bathroom is IP44 rated and is outside zone 1 and 2.
      The loft with the cable running along the floor also houses the boiler, so yes, it will be accessed from time to time so I think that I need to have the cable secured.
      I will ask the tenant to unplug their extension lead for their own secondary fridge
      It does seem as if many of the points were unnecessary, particularly given that the installations met the guidelines in force at the time. Definitely a case of me finding another electrician to do any remedial work and steer well clear of the company that did the EICR
      Interesting point about calling original Electrician’s registration body. Thanks again!

  7. There must be some “honest” electricians around. When an Electrician “passes” an inspection off – he takes full liability for the Safety of the installation (for the next 5 years on rented, or 10 on a private house) (only on how it was when he tested – not liable for future bodging!) – But that is no reason to “look for work where none exists”. I usually allow 3.5 hours to test and “correct” minor problems (including broken / loose rings which are common, faulty sockets etc.) [typical 3 bed semi] – I would rather fix and pass it, than negotiate return work. Sometimes I “recommend” some improvements including recommending Fbox be upgraded if using an RCD as a main switch (future single point failure of an obsolete part), over 20 years old or just lack of RCD’s on lights – but I don’t hold a gun to the owners head! I have fitted quite a few Fbox’s this year, but none of them have been forced on the owner. I did require one Landlord to replace the Electric shower before I would pass it (I don’t fit Showers – just the electrical connections!) – but that was because the wiring had melted inside on the Manufactures wiring joints! On a another occasion I found the connector block melted where the main cable connects – It was fitted by “the plumber” two years earlier – I just replaced the burnt connector, remade the burnt ends of the cable and passed the installation. Problems with showers (as above), show WHY a “proper” inspection every few years is a good idea – I prevented the house catching fire!

  8. Hello Tony

    I came across you website as I have recently received my first EICR, which failed as unsatisfactory. I appreciate that you have provided very good advice to others and would be really grateful if you could help look at my report and give some of your thoughts please.

    My property was a three storey town house built in 1960’s, with some major rewiring work done in 2006/2007 to comply with regulations at the time. Rest of the electric installation was completed before then.

    The inspection was failed for two items:
    1 Inspection Schedule Item 5.13: Provision of fire barriers, sealing arrangements and protection
    against thermal effects (Section 527) is in a potentially dangerous condition. Urgent remedial
    action is required. C2
    2 Inspection Schedule Item 5.2: Cables correctly supported throughout their run (521.10.202;
    522.8.5) is in a potentially dangerous condition. Urgent remedial action is required. C2

    The first one was referring to 6 LED downlights not being fire rated in each of the two bedrooms: bedroom one is a garage converted bedroom on the ground floor, above the ceiling is the lounge/living room; bedroom two is the master bedroom on 2nd floor, above the ceiling is the attic. These spot lights have been installed in the house for at least 15 years. Do they have to be fire rated? They quoted £300 for supplying and replacing the 12 LED downlights to fire rated compliance, which I think it’s quite hefty if anyone can change the light bulbs themselves?

    The second one was referring to a cable connected to socket that was not enclosed with a trunking case. This white PVC cable has been there for at least 15 years with no visible coloured cables wrapped inside. I have used the socket when living in the property for 7 years, then my tenants using it for many years afterwards with no problems at all. I wonder how is this c2 problem if the installation was already in place before 2008 and working fine in all these many years? They quoted £50 for putting a trunking case over the cable.

    I would be really grateful if you could comment on these and I wonder if I still need to get a satisfactory report afterwards as the inspector requires a further payment for a satisfactory report if remedial work is not being carried out by themselves.

    Much appreciate it and I look forward to hearing from you.

    Kind regards,
    Serena

  9. Serena

    Item 1: Fire barriers. It is NOT required (even today) to fit Fire-Rated Downlights – Non- rated lights are readily available from all suppliers. However, *I* would *never* fit non-fire rated lights as a measure of safety. This is a “recommendation” under Building Regulations and *cannot* be a C2 (Dangerous if ELECTRICAL FAULT occurs) – Just google the internet for “are fire rated downlights required” – Here’s one example:
    https://www.electriciancourses4u.co.uk/blog/what-are-fire-rated-downlights/

    Its not a case of “just changing the bulbs” – each fitting will need to be removed completely and replaced with “fire-rated” downlights (which are NOT required!). Each of the original lights would have to be disconnected from the installed wiring and new ones connected in their place – this could involve quite a bit of labour.

    Surface wiring and trunking. Trunking is NOT a requirement – This is called “Surface Mounting” or “Clipped Direct” – it is referred to as Installation Method C.

    If the cable is not damaged, not showing inner cores, suitably rated for the current – then HOW is this a C2? If the cables are NOT correctly supported – then it just needs some more cable clips fitting.

    Quote:
    >>>>
    Reference Method C
    Clipped direct:
    For example – Installation method 20 of Table 4A2 (single-core or multicore cables on a wooden or masonry wall).

    Cable mounted on a wooden wall so that the gap between the cable and the surface is less than 0.3 times the cable diameter. Where the cable is fixed to or embedded in a masonry wall the current-carrying capacity may be higher.

    Note: The term ‘masonry’ is taken to include brickwork, concrete, plaster and similar (but excluding thermally insulating materials).
    <<<< As you are a "Landlord" you NEED to have an EICR signed off by an Electrician who is "Competent" to carry out EICR's. To be sure - you need an Electrician that is "Qualified to Carry out Inspection & Testing" - and Also carries "Professional Indemnity" insurance. You do NOT need to have the entire system retested - only the "Failed items" need to be addressed. I suggest you find a suitable local electrician who is prepared to investigate and "rectify" the failures - in your case - most likely state in writing on his certificate the original C2's were incorrect. >>>
    …the inspector requires a further payment for a satisfactory report if remedial work is not being carried out by themselves.
    <<< The Electrician that carries out the repairs is required to issue a report detailing the original defects he has "fixed" and that it is now "Acceptable". This is held by you along with the Original EICR report as your evidence of a Satisfactory System. NAPIT have a form for this -they call it: "Landlord Electrical Installation Safety Record" - I don't know about the other Registration Bodies. Otherwise, you need to ask the "replacement" testing Electrician to give you a simple report detailing the faults "fixed" and certifying that is is now safe. Dated, along with his name & trading details. So NO, you don't need another complete test and certificate - just an additional report that is read in conjunction with the "failed" one you already have. Look here for a suitable Electrician who is "Registered to carry out Inspection & Testing". https://www.electricalcompetentperson.co.uk/

    Phone them and discuss your situation. Let me know how you get on.

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